Ebola Is Here: Avoid The Two Extremes

Ebola In The U.S.

So Ebola has reached the U.S. The first confirmed case in Dallas made its way to the headlines, now children who were in contact with this man are being sought out. Parents are now pulling their kids from schools. Is there a need to sound the alarm? Sure! A simple history book will refresh anyone on the devastating effects of plagues upon nations. Ebola has so far killed over 3,000 and infected over 7,000 in Africa without ebolaany sure signs of it being brought under control. Now we are facing our first confirmed case of Ebola in the States and a better question is how loud we should sound the alarm. Unfortunately, due to their perpetual frantic search for ‘a good story,’ this information was presented to our nation with an open flood gate; local media, websites such as The Druge Report, CNN, etc., and it is now basically all we can discuss these days.

The above presents our one extreme; a scared and worried nation.

The second extreme comes in the form of those who live life with no cares and worries and fail to inform themselves or prepare themselves for
such a matter. Comments such as, “Well I better stock up on some more beer” or Twitter jokes of Ebola zombies surface and it is these folks who actually present a threat to the containment of this potentially serious matter.

This is our other extreme; a careless and worry free nation.

So what is it that caused Ebola to spread so rapidly in Africa? According to this report, it is simply the lack of medical protection and sanitary practices. Ebola is spread through bodily fluids, not through the air. One article noted:

“Nurses, some not wearing gloves and others in street clothes, clustered by the door as pools of the patients’ bodily fluids spread to the threshold.”

The nurses at these hospitals are “lightly trained and minimally protected” and Ebola patients are dying “surrounded by pools of infectious waste.”

So what should our attitude be toward this virus in order to strike a balance between the two extremes?

  1. Do not become a scared and worried nation. Ebola is spread through fluids and is not airborne. We have the resources to contain the disease when it presents itself and are educated on the precautions to take to avoid this virus and ultimately how to control it. Do your part and be diligent in taking care of yourself and others.
  2. Don’t be a careless and worry free nation. Do not ignore this as another ‘passing bug,’ but take this serious and be diligent in doing your part to take precautions toward yourself and others.

Remember to pray for Africa, for the people, the medical facilities, and the aid sent there, that this virus gets contained and destroyed.